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Journey into revolution;: Petrograd, 1917-1918

Author: Albert Rhys Williams

Genre: Updating

PRODUCT DETAILS
Publisher: Quadrangle Books / Published Year: 1969

Pages: 346 pages / Weight: g

Dimensions: 235 x 160 x 30 mm

Notes: No dust jacket-Many pages are stained


SHORT DESCRIPTION
Journey into Revolution is the story of a young American’s confronta- tion with the great revolution of the twentieth century, the Revolution in Russia in 1917. One may ask why such a work is so timely now, when the event is more than fifty years in the distance. Rhys Williams might say that Revolution set the pace for all the revolutionary movements to follow, but, whether you agree with him or not, this is the voice of a thoughtful man who often sounds closer to the dissenting voices of militant students from around the world in the late sixties than the voices of their living and often censorious elder kin. Though this book was pulled together from voluminous beginnings and multiple notes after Williams’ death in 1962, the voice is the same voice that spoke in his eyewitness account of the turbulent days of 1917-1918, when he had come from Russia across Siberia to Vladivostok; had taken ship to America when young American soldiers were landing for the Allied Inter- ventionist war against the new regime; had been confiscated of his papers and the first draft of Through the Russian Revolution in Honolulu and San Francisco; and had met, head on, the interrogators for Washington officialdom who wanted to know about himself, the Bolsheviks, and his role as an activist in the October Revolution.

Available: Out of stock

Variants
0931804288

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Journey into Revolution is the story of a young American’s confronta- tion with the great revolution of the twentieth century, the Revolution in Russia in 1917. One may ask why such a work is so timely now, when the event is more than fifty years in the distance. Rhys Williams might say that Revolution set the pace for all the revolutionary movements to follow, but, whether you agree with him or not, this is the voice of a thoughtful man who often sounds closer to the dissenting voices of militant students from around the world in the late sixties than the voices of their living and often censorious elder kin.

Though this book was pulled together from voluminous beginnings and multiple notes after Williams’ death in 1962, the voice is the same voice that spoke in his eyewitness account of the turbulent days of 1917-1918, when he had come from Russia across Siberia to Vladivostok; had taken ship to America when young American soldiers were landing for the Allied Inter- ventionist war against the new regime; had been confiscated of his papers and the first draft of Through the Russian Revolution in Honolulu and San Francisco; and had met, head on, the interrogators for Washington officialdom who wanted to know about himself, the Bolsheviks, and his role as an activist in the October Revolution.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR